Microsoft patches Windows XP to fight ‘WannaCrypt’ attacks

Microsoft officially ended its support for most Windows XP computers back in 2014, but today it’s delivering one more public patch for the 16-year-old OS. As described in a post on its Windows Security blog, it’s taking this “highly unusual” step after customers worldwide including England’s National Health Service suffered a hit from “WannaCrypt” ransomware. Microsoft patched all of its currently supported systems to fix the flaw back in March, but now there’s an update available for unsupported systems too, including Windows XP, Windows 8 and Windows Server 2003, which you can grab here (note: if that link isn’t working then there are direct download links available in the Security blog post).

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Verizon outmaneuvers AT&T, scoops up big-time 5G network acquisition

Last month it was reported that AT&T was buying Straight Path, a very important 5G spectrum holder for $1.25 billion. The hefty sum ended up not being enough as Verizon swooped in at the last second and outbid AT&T to acquire Straight Path.

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Microsoft’s new cloud clipboard lets you paste from a Windows 10 PC to an iPhone

Microsoft is unveiling a new cloud clipboard service today at the company’s Build developers conference in Seattle. While the software maker has been experimenting with a variety of clipboard services, it has finally settled on one that will be implemented directly into Windows 10. The new cloud-powered clipboard will let Windows 10 users copy content from an app and paste it on mobile devices like iPhones or Android handsets.

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Microsoft has patched a major Windows Defender bug

Microsoft has rolled out an emergency update for machines running Windows 7, 8.1, RT and 10 to patch a nasty bug that was uncovered by Google Project Zero researchers Natalie Silvanovich and Tavis Ormandy over the weekend.

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Google Chrome will automatically switch to 64-bit on compatible PCs

Google has confirmed that its latest Chrome upgrade will automatically switch from 32-bit to 64-bit on compatible Windows machines. The latter is a much more efficient browser, with greater performance and security. However, some users simply haven’t ditched 32-bit yet.

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Microsoft announces Windows 10 S to ease teaching in schools

Microsoft announced a new version of Windows 10 on Tuesday that is built specifically for use in schools. Windows 10 S is a slimmed down version of the popular operating system that narrows down what can be loaded onto the laptops by restricting users to only approved apps from the Windows Store. Should an educator need to load an app not from the store, they will have the option to do so as an administrator.

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The zombies are coming (to Call of Duty: WWII)

This year’s Call of Duty is ultra-serious. Not that previous ones hadn’t been, but the return to World War II demands a bit more respect than jetpacks and spaceships. There was some concern then, among all the focus on realism and respect, that there wouldn’t be any room for the poor, unfortunate undead.

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Samsung rolls out ‘urgent update’ to fix DQA error on the Galaxy S8

Samsung is in the midst of rolling out an “urgent software update” through its Galaxy Apps Store for the Galaxy S8 in Canada and the U.S. The upgrade patches a bug that resulted in some units displaying an alert as often as every 30-seconds, informing owners that “DQA keeps stopping.”

 

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Teen hacker behind Microsoft and Sony hacks gets a light two-year sentence

When I think about who might be responsible for nearly two million attacks on websites and services costing companies millions of dollars, I’m not sure who I picture. But it’s not Adam Mudd, the teen responsible for 1.7 million attacks on services like Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network. According to The Guardian, Mudd has been sentenced to two years in prison for his hacking-related crimes.

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You can finally use your PayPal account to pay for goods through Android Pay

In addition to introducing compatibility for 18 more banks and credit unions in the United States, Google has announced that it has partnered with PayPal to provide customers with the facility to spend their PayPal Balance using Android Pay.

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